Young child asleep in a hot car

12 Ways to Prevent the Tragedy of Hot Car Death

Imagine walking across the hot parking lot after a long day’s work, opening your car door and realizing with horror that the child you were supposed to drop off at daycare is still in the car.

At that moment, the world stops, shock hits like a sledgehammer, and the guilt and gut-wrenching grief will change your life forever.

How do hot car tragedies happen, and what can we do to prevent them? Read more.

Click here for information about Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR training

Red pills in the shape of a heart

Benefits of Free Opioid Addiction Treatment

On June 6, 2023, British Columbia, Canada, became the first Canadian province to provide free, universal treatment for opioid addiction. Though some argue against free treatment for substance use, results from other countries overwhelmingly support this approach. Shifting from a criminal to a public health focus by reducing stigma and removing financial barriers to treatments pays off in the long run for individuals and communities.

This article explores the arguments for and against providing free opioid addiction treatment. Read more

Take this FREE online course and receive a complimentary Naloxone kit! First Aid for Opioid Poisoning Emergencies

A first aid course student holding a baby CPR manikin. Emergency Child Care First Aid FAQs

Emergency Child Care First Aid FAQs

Are you a child care worker, parent, grandparent or babysitter living in the Coquitlam area? If so, you need first aid training. Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B is the best course for you. Please read our Emergency Child Care First Aid FAQs, visit our Emergency Child Care First Aid page or contact us. We look forward to seeing you in one of our classes soon.

About Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR Level B

Q: What is Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR Level B?
Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR Level B is a one-day course introducing caregivers to injury prevention skills and knowledge. The class covers lifesaving first aid skills and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and AED) for children and babies. Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR meets legislation and safety requirements for provincial/territorial early childhood education and child care workers. It is recognized by BC Child Care Licensing for child care workers and ECE students in British Columbia.

Q: Who should take Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B?
Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B is designed for child care workers and parents. Anyone caring for a baby or young child can benefit from this training, including siblings aged 12+, grandparents and adult babysitters.

Q: I am an Early Childhood Education (ECE) student. Is Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B the right first aid course for me?
Yes. Most ECE students take Emergency Child Care first aid & CPR B. You can confirm this with your school before registering for a first aid course.

Q: Does Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid include CPR Level B?
Yes. The Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid & CPR course includes CPR Level B.

Q: Does Emergency Child Care first aid include AED (defibrillator) training?
Yes. The Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid & CPR course includes AED training.

Q: Are there any prerequisites for the Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid course?
There are no prerequisites for the Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care course. Adults and children aged 12 years and up can take Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid & CPR.

Q: How long is the course?
The Canadian Red Cross Emergency Child Care first aid & CPR course includes eight hours of training plus breaks. When you attend the course, expect to be at the course location for approximately nine hours. BC Child Care Licensing requires child care workers to take a first aid course which includes at least eight hours of instruction.

Q: What topics does Red Cross Emergency Child Care CPR B course include?

Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid includes the following topics:

  • The Red Cross
  • Responding to Emergencies
  • The EMS system
  • Check, Call, Care
  • Airway emergencies
  • Breathing and Circulation emergencies – Child and baby
  • First aid for respiratory and cardiac arrest – Child and baby
  • Wound care
  • Head, Neck and Spinal Injuries
  • Bone, Muscle, and Joint Injuries
  • Sudden Medical Emergencies
  • Environmental Illness
  • Poisons
  • Caring for Children

Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR classes in Coquitlam

Q: Where can I find an Emergency Child care First Aid course schedule for Coquitlam classes?
Please click here for Emergency Child care First Aid courses in Coquitlam.

 

Private Group First Aid & CPR Training

Q: I run a child care centre, and my workers need first aid training. How can I book a group training session?
Please contact us about booking a private group Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B course at our Coquitlam classroom. We will gladly provide information, including available dates and a quote for your training.

 

Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR Training in BC

Q: According to the BC Child Care Licensing Regulation, what are the requirements for first aid training?
See Schedule C “First Aid” of the BC Child  Care Licensing Regulation

Q: Where can I find the BC Child Care Licensing Regulation?
BC Child Care Licensing Regulation Scroll down the document to “Schedule C” – First Aid.

Q: Are there any virtual classes for baby or child first aid and CPR?
BC Child Care Licensing does not accept online or virtual training in place of in-person first aid & CPR training. There are online courses for those looking to refresh their memory between first aid classes.

 

FAQ’s About CPR Levels

Q: What does Red Cross CPR level B cover?
Red Cross CPR level B covers skills for the infant (0-1 year) and child (1-8 years). If you work with older children, we recommend you take Standard First Aid & CPR Level C. This course covers skills for all age groups, including adults and meets BC Child Care Licensing requirements for child care workers.

Q: What level of CPR should I have if I care for children aged eight years and up?
People caring for children older than eight years need a course that includes CPR level C. CPR C covers skills for all ages – infant, child and adult. If you work with older children, we recommend you take Standard First Aid & CPR Level C.

Q: What is the difference between CPR levels A, B and C?
CPR A covers skills for adults only.
CPR B covers skills for babies and children aged 0-8 years.
CPR C covers skills for babies, children and adults.

 

First Aid & CPR Training for ESL Students

Q: English is not my first language. Can I get a book to study before my Red Cross first aid class?
Yes. When you have registered for your Red Cross first aid class, please ask us to email you a PDF of the course book.

Q: I need to take an Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR with a Korean-speaking instructor. Can you help?
Yes. Our instructor, Lucy teaches classes for Korean students. Please contact us and we’ll put you in touch with her.

Q: What are the qualifications of a Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid instructor?
A Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR course is taught by a certified Red Cross First Aid Instructor or Red Cross Instructor Trainer.

 

Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR Certification and Recertification

Q: What are the completion requirements for Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid?
To receive Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid certification, participants must:

  • Attend and participate in 100% of the Emergency Child Care First Aid course.
  • Successfully demonstrate skills and critical steps.
  • Achieve a minimum mark of 75% for the written knowledge evaluation.

Q: When will I get my certificate after completing my Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR course?
Red Cross emails PDF certificates directly to students – usually within three days of the course date.

Q: How long is a Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid certification good for?
Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid certification is good for three years from the course date.

Q: Can I take a Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid recertification course to renew my certificate?
Child care workers in BC must take a course that includes eight hours of training to renew their certification. The BC Child Care regulation states that the certificate “is not renewable unless the holder, before the expiry date, participates in at least 8 hours of further instruction, at least 3.5 hours of which must be delivered in person, followed by an examination that includes demonstration and evaluation of the skills relevant to the matters described in section 2 of this Schedule (Schedule C of the BC Child Care Regulation.”

Even though the Canadian Red Cross offers a 6-hour recertification class, BC Child Care Licensing does not accept this. Therefore, Safe + Sound only provides the full course, not the recertification class.

Q: What materials do Emergency Child Care First Aid course participants receive?

  • Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid course participants receive:
    Red Cross Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR B certificate (digital certificate issued upon successful completion)
  • CPR mask
  • The Canadian Red Cross “Child Care First Aid Manual” (eBook) is available for you to download upon completion of the class. Once certified, course participants can find digital manuals here: My Red Cross (myrc.redcross.ca) > My Profile > My Digital Books.

Questions About Emergency Child Care First Aid

Q: I have a question about Emergency Child Care First Aid.
If you can’t find the answer to your question in our Emergency Child Care First Aid FAQs on this page, please get in touch with us.

We look forward to chatting with you soon!

Ignoring Small Injuries Can Have Serious Consequences

Take care of cuts and scrapes — don’t end up like Bill

None of us want to go to the doctor or hospital unless we have to, so we need to take good care of ourselves. A small injury that becomes infected can lead to a life or limb-threatening condition. 

A friend nearly lost his leg from a neglected scratch

A few years ago, I’d brought my dad into the ER at Royal Columbian Hospital. While we were sitting in the waiting room, an old family friend, hobbled in with his wife. I could see that Bill was struggling to walk, and I asked what had happened. 

He said he’d hurt his leg and pulled up his pant leg to show us. I was horrified! His leg was severely swollen, and the skin had a nasty, blue mottled appearance. He told us that he’d scratched the back of his ankle and hadn’t thought much about it until it started to get sore. His leg had become red, swollen and increasingly painful, so he went to the doctor. The doctor sent him straight to the ER. Every day for the next two weeks, Bill’s wife had to drive him to the hospital for IV antibiotic treatment. The doctors told Bill he was lucky he hadn’t lost his leg. 

First aid for a small cut or scrape

  • Cover the wound first and clean around the injured area using mild soap and gauze or an antiseptic wipe. Do not use iodine, alcohol, or hydrogen peroxide.
  • Once the area around the wound is clean, clean the cut with running water.
  • Remove any slivers or gravel with alcohol-sterilized tweezers.
  • Blot dry with sterile gauze.
  • Small cuts usually stop bleeding quickly, but if the wound is still bleeding, apply firm, gentle pressure with gauze. If blood soaks through, put another piece of gauze on top. Don’t remove the old one, or you might start the bleeding again.
  • Once the bleeding has stopped apply a small amount of antibiotic cream to reduce the risk of infection.
  • Cover the wound with a sterile dressing and change it every 24 hours.
  • Keep the dressing clean and dry. If the dressing becomes wet or dirty, replace it immediately. 
  • If the skin under the bandage feels itchy, you may have an allergy to the adhesive used in some bandages. For sensitive skin, try switching to sterile gauze and paper tape, or an adhesive-free dressing.

If you see signs of infection, seek medical advice without delay.

Recognizing signs of Infection

Signs of an infection include:

  • swelling
  • redness that spreads out from the injury
  • increased pain or tenderness
  • the area feels hot or warm to touch
  • oozing pus or liquid
  • swollen lymph nodes in the neck, armpit, or groin
  • body aches chills and fever
  • slow healing or wound doesn’t seem to be healing at all

If you have any of these signs, seek medical advice.

April 28 National Day of Mourning – Don’t be the Reason Someone Lights a Candle

The National Day of Mourning, held annually in Canada on April 28, is dedicated to remembering workers who have lost their lives or suffered a work-related injury or illness.

Latest Statistics for British Columbia

WorkSafeBC report for 2018 shows:

  • 155,753 injuries
  • 190 work-related deaths
  • 50,000 short term disability claims
  • 2.9 million days lost from work

Young workers are particularly vulnerable

When I read the death and injury statistics each year, the section I always stop on is the one showing the injuries and deaths of young workers. According to CCOHS, in 2018, Canada, 27 young workers under 25 years of age died in workplace tragedies. Each death leaves a family devastated, and the lives of friends and co-workers deeply impacted.

I have an 18-year-old daughter and a 21-year-old son. The thought of either of them suffering a severe injury in the workplace is unbearable. I can’t imagine how the parents and families of young people who have lost their lives at work can manage to carry on.

Young people must get the right training for the job they are doing. They need to speak up if they don’t feel safe in their workplace or are uncomfortable with the task they have been asked to do because of a lack of knowledge or training.

Story of an injured young worker

In the words of Jack Thomas – an injured young worker:

“I always used to be one of those people that thinks it’s going to happen to somebody else, not myself. That’s not true at all.”

When Jack was 17, his sleeve got caught in a roller while cleaning around a sorting conveyor. Tragically, Jack lost his right arm. Watch this video to learn how Jack courageously came back from his injury.

 

Workers’ rights and employers’ responsibilities

Workers have the right to know the hazards in their workplace and participate in health and safety training. They also have the right to refuse unsafe work without fear of getting punished or fired.

Employers have a responsibility to provide adequate training for their workers and provide a safe workplace. Young workers often lack the confidence to speak up and ask for additional training. Employers must create an environment where workers feel comfortable to ask questions and share their concerns.

It only takes a second to suffer from a life-changing accident or injury.

Don’t become a statistic in next year’s WorkSafeBC report.

Don’t be the cause of a statistic in next year’s WorkSafeBC report.

Don’t be a reason for someone to light a candle.

workers providing first aid to injured co-worker

Legal Issues Around First Aid

Can I be sued for giving first aid?

Many people fear being sued for coming to the aid of someone with an injury. This same fear often prevents people from getting trained in first aid. You’ve probably heard the parable of the Good Samaritan. The clear message in this story is that assisting those in trouble is the right thing to do.

The law in every province in Canada encourages bystanders to give first aid. In BC, we have the Good Samaritan Act. It specifically protects, against liability, citizens and medical professionals who act in good faith to give emergency assistance to ill or injured persons at the scene of an emergency. Under these laws, a person providing first aid who acts reasonably and prudently under the conditions of an emergency cannot be held responsible for the injuries suffered by the victim.

There is no general legal duty to help someone in an emergency except for a person who is involved in a motor vehicle accident. That person must stop and give all possible assistance to the persons involved. A failure to do so could mean being charged under the criminal code.

First aiders must:

–          Get permission, if possible before giving care

–          Give only the care they were trained to provide

–          Continue giving care until another trained person takes over, they are too exhausted to continue, the scene becomes unsafe, or the person’s condition improves and care is no longer required.

Getting Permission to Help an Injured Person

–          For an unresponsive person, the law assumes you have permission

–          For a young child without a caregiver, provide care.

–          If a person refuses care call EMS/911 and stand by if it is safe to do so.

Duty to report Child Abuse or Neglect in Canada

Every adult in Canada has a legal duty to report child abuse or neglect, even if it is not confirmed. Information about how to report details can be found in your jurisdiction’s child protection act, but the duty to report is uniform in all acts. If you think a child is being harmed, then a report to child protection and /or the police needs to occur.

You never know when you are going to be called upon to assist in an emergency situation. It could be today.

Safe + Sound provides the following Red Cross courses:

Standard First Aid & CPR/AED (OFA Level 1 equivalent)

Emergency First Aid & CPR/AED (OFA Level 1 equivalent)

Emergency Child Care First Aid & CPR/AED Level B

CPR/AED Level A or C

Basic Life Support (BLS)

Babysitting (for 11-15 year olds)

We also offer:

Mental Health First Aid – Basic 

Mental Health First Aid – for Adults who Interact With Youth

and Online Safety Training

Check our online course library

If you’re not sure which first aid/CPR course to take, please contact us and we’ll be happy to help.

Book a private class for your team or register for a course today.

Learn to save a life.